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Monday, November 5, 2012

{Book Tour} Life After the Undead Pembroke Sinclair


Monsters come and go in cycles. For a while, the vampire was popular (still is in some cases), then there were werewolves, and at times, zombies. At the moment, we are in a zombie craze. The popularity of “The Walking Dead” attests to that, as does the release of World War Z with Brad Pitt. For some of us, though, zombies really never go out of style. We like them whenever, even when they aren’t cool.

I’m one who always likes zombies. I’ll watch any movie that has zombies in it. And, trust me, I’ve seen some pretty bad ones. Those I don’t finish, but I at least give them a try. I love to read zombie stories. I’ve read some great ones. World War Z, of course, along with The Zombie Survival Guide, and I’ve read some great books from friends of mine (The Cold Beneath by Tonia Brown) and several collections of short stories. Even when the zombie craze dies out, you’ll still find people devoting their lives to the genre.

When I wrote Life After the Undead, I wasn’t intending to write for the craze. I just had a story that needed telling that happened to coincide with the next cycle of monsters. Writing during a craze doesn’t automatically mean you’re going to be popular. In some cases, it’s harder to get noticed. So many people are writing in the same genre, how are you going to stand out? Still, I wasn’t going to let that stop me. My brain said write a story about zombies, so I wrote a story about zombies.

I’m a purist, meaning my zombies more closely resemble the George Romero notion of zombies, not the 28 Days Later zombies. Mine are slow and crave human flesh. They attack in large numbers, and they easily overcome the living. However, to keep things fresh, I had to change things up a little. I didn’t want to rehash old story lines, so I made my zombies aware that humidity will deteriorate them faster than being in a dry environment. The humans have to figure out how to use that knowledge to their advantage to overcome their undead foe.

I hope that zombies will be around for a while longer, but, eventually, the cycle *will* change and a new monster will reign supreme. Even then, though, I’m still going to enjoy writing, reading, and watching zombies. I hope you will, too.Monsters come and go in cycles. For a while, the vampire was popular (still is in some cases), then there were werewolves, and at times, zombies. At the moment, we are in a zombie craze. The popularity of “The Walking Dead” attests to that, as does the release of World War Z with Brad Pitt. For some of us, though, zombies really never go out of style. We like them whenever, even when they aren’t cool.

I’m one who always likes zombies. I’ll watch any movie that has zombies in it. And, trust me, I’ve seen some pretty bad ones. Those I don’t finish, but I at least give them a try. I love to read zombie stories. I’ve read some great ones. World War Z, of course, along with The Zombie Survival Guide, and I’ve read some great books from friends of mine (The Cold Beneath by Tonia Brown) and several collections of short stories. Even when the zombie craze dies out, you’ll still find people devoting their lives to the genre.

When I wrote Life After the Undead, I wasn’t intending to write for the craze. I just had a story that needed telling that happened to coincide with the next cycle of monsters. Writing during a craze doesn’t automatically mean you’re going to be popular. In some cases, it’s harder to get noticed. So many people are writing in the same genre, how are you going to stand out? Still, I wasn’t going to let that stop me. My brain said write a story about zombies, so I wrote a story about zombies.

I’m a purist, meaning my zombies more closely resemble the George Romero notion of zombies, not the 28 Days Later zombies. Mine are slow and crave human flesh. They attack in large numbers, and they easily overcome the living. However, to keep things fresh, I had to change things up a little. I didn’t want to rehash old story lines, so I made my zombies aware that humidity will deteriorate them faster than being in a dry environment. The humans have to figure out how to use that knowledge to their advantage to overcome their undead foe.

I hope that zombies will be around for a while longer, but, eventually, the cycle *will* change and a new monster will reign supreme. Even then, though, I’m still going to enjoy writing, reading, and watching zombies. I hope you will, too.


Life After the Undead
Pembroke Sinclair

Genre: YA Horror
Publisher: eTreasures Publishing

ISBN: ISBN-10: 1937809013
ISBN-13: 978-1937809010

Number of pages: 356

Cover Artist: Jerrod Brown



Book Description:

The world has come to an end. It doesn’t go out with a bang, or even a whimper. It goes out in an orgy of blood and the dead rising from their graves to feast on living flesh. As democracy crumples and the world melts into anarchy, five families in the U.S. rise to protect the survivors.

The undead hate a humid environment, so they are migrating westward to escape its deteriorating effects. The survivors are constructing a wall in North Platte to keep the zombie threat to the west, while tyranny rules among the humans to the east.

Capable but na├»ve Krista is 15 when the first attacks occur, and she loses her family and barely escapes with her life. She makes her way to the wall and begins a new life. But, as the undead threat grows and dictators brainwash those she cares about, Krista must fight not only to survive but also to defend everything she holds dear—her country, her freedom, and ultimately those she loves.

About the Author
Pembroke Sinclair has had several short stories published. Her story, “Sohei,” was named one of the Best Stories of 2008 by The Cynic Online Magazine. She has novellas and a short story collection available from Musa Publishing and eTreasures Publishing. Her two novels, Coming from Nowhere (adult, sci fi) and Life After the Undead (YA, horror), are available from eTreasures Publishing, as well as Death to the Undead (YA, sequel to Life After the Undead), which is forthcoming. Life After the Undead was a Top Ten Finisher in the Preditors and Editors Reader’s Poll in the YA category and the cover art category.

As Jessica Robinson, from March 2008 to January 2011, she wrote scientific articles for Western Farmer-Stockman. Her nonfiction book, Life Lessons from Slasher Films, is available from Scarecrow Publishing (an imprint of Rowman and Littlefield).

Jessica/Pembroke received her Master’s in English, and she is a freelance content editor for Musa Publishing, as well as a former content and line editor for eTreasures Publishing.




1 comment:

  1. Thank you so much for having me! I enjoyed blogging for you!

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